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Natural Ventilation

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Natural Ventilation

Course Information

This course provides guidance on how to model natural ventilation design and incorporate this into a dynamic simulation. Integrate operational windows and include window actuator controls as part of the annual energy simulation to evaluate the inter-relationship between ventilation, CO2 levels, occupant comfort, and overheating potential.

Results can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different ventilation strategies, opening controls, and window opening categories, and to see a reduced need for air conditioning when using natural / mixed-mode strategies.

The first series of lessons will take you step by step through how to create a zonal airflow model to calculate bulk air movement in and through the building, driven by wind and buoyancy-induced pressures. It can be applied to a simulation as the sole source of ventilation, or in conjunction with mechanical or full HVAC systems.

You will learn how to:

  • Create and assign different opening types
  • Apply opening profiles to the opening types
  • Apply opening types to the dynamic simulation,
    • To analyze natural ventilation
    • To impact on load results
  • Consider the simulation results to assess and compare different ventilation strategies.

The following lessons demonstrate:

  • Modeling Various Natural Ventilation Strategies
  • Thermal Comfort Assessments (post-simulation)
  • Analysis of Occupant Relative Productivity
  • The use of wind pressure coefficients derived from a CFD analysis of an example buildinge
  • The input of bespoke wind pressure coefficients in MacroFlo, IES’s natural ventilation tool

Why Choose the NATURAL VENTILATION Course?

  • Integration of Operational Windows and Controls

    Participants will learn how to integrate operational windows and window actuator controls into annual energy simulations. This integration allows for the evaluation of the impact of natural ventilation on energy consumption, enabling the assessment of different ventilation strategies, opening controls, and window categories.

  • Dynamic Simulation for Bulk Air Movement

    The first series of lessons take participants step by step through creating a zonal airflow model. This model calculates bulk air movement driven by wind and buoyancy-induced pressures. It can be applied as the sole source of ventilation or in conjunction with mechanical or full HVAC systems, providing flexibility in design options.

  • Zonal Airflow Model Analysis

    The course covers the analysis of a zonal airflow model, considering wind and buoyancy-induced pressures. This in-depth understanding allows participants to make informed decisions about the role of natural ventilation in the overall building design.

  • Utilization of CFD Analysis and MacroFlo

    The course introduces the use of wind pressure coefficients derived from a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. Participants will also learn to input bespoke wind pressure coefficients in MacroFlo, IES’s natural ventilation tool. This exposure to advanced tools adds a practical dimension to the course.

Course Curriculum

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Ever find yourself staring at your computer screen a good consulting slogan to come to mind? Oftentimes.